Last edited by Zulugami
Tuesday, December 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Some Anglicised surnames in Ireland found in the catalog.

Some Anglicised surnames in Ireland

Padraig Mac Giolla-Domhnaigh

Some Anglicised surnames in Ireland

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  • 22 Currently reading

Published by The Gael Co-operative Society in Dublin .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Names, Personal -- Ireland -- Ulster.,
  • Names, Personal -- Irish.,
  • Names, Personal -- Scottish.,
  • Ulster (Ireland) -- Genealogy.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Padraig Mac Giolla-Domhnaigh.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination64p. ;
    Number of Pages64
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23129622M

    What follows also includes some advanced family history tips for researching any surname with a connection to Ireland in the database. (anglicised McConsidine or Mac Considine). Two excellent books on surnames are Edward MacLysaght, Surnames of Ireland and Robert Bell, Book of Ulster Surnames.


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Some Anglicised surnames in Ireland by Padraig Mac Giolla-Domhnaigh Download PDF EPUB FB2

Some Anglicised Surnames in Ireland. Padraig Mac Giolla-Domhnaigh. Some Anglicised Surnames in Ireland. Foreword. Preface. it conveys the reality of the calamity in a much more telling way.

The book is also available in Kindle. The Ocean Plague: or, A Voyage to Quebec in an Irish Emigrant Vessel is based upon the diary of Robert Whyte.

Genre/Form: Genealogy: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Mac Giolla Domhnaigh, Padraig. Some Anglicised surnames in Ireland. Dublin: Gael Co-Operative Society, Some Anglicised Surnames in Ireland.

Adair. Adams, Adamson. Addy, Addie, Adie. Adrain. Agnew. Alexander. Allanson, Allison, Alison. Padraig Mac Giolla-Domhnaigh.

Some Anglicised Surnames in Ireland. Small —In the districts about Limavady and Derry City the names Gilkie and Kilkey, respectively, are anglicised Small.

(In Gaelic Mac Giollachaoich). Pages in category "Anglicised Irish-language surnames" The following pages are in this category, out of approximately total. This list may not reflect recent changes (learn more). Some Anglicised Surnames in Ireland.

Dagnall. Darby. Darragh. Davenport, Dunford, and Dunworth. Davison, Davis. Dawson. De Moleyns. Most Gaelic language surnames of Ireland, Scotland, and the Isle of Man have been anglicised at some time. The Gaels were among the first Europeans to adopt surnames during the Dark Ages.

Originally, most Gaelic surnames were composed of the given name of a child's father, preceded by Mac (son) or Nic (or Ní, both being variants of nighean, meaning daughter) depending on the gender.

Index to anglicised surnames beginning with the letter L, from 'Some Anglicised Surnames in Ireland', by Padraig Mac Giolla-Domhnaigh The book is also available in Kindle. The Ocean Plague: or, A Voyage to Quebec in an Irish Emigrant Vessel is based upon the diary of.

The most common Irish surnames in Ireland haven’t changed much for a century. Here are 10 of them: 1. Murphy — The Anglicized version of the Irish surname Ó. According to Patrick Woulfe in his book “Irish Names and Surnames” the “Tucker” surname arose from the native Gaelic name “O’Tuachair,” or more correctly “Uá Tuathchair,” loosely translated “people dear,” and was anglicized as Tucker, Togher, Tougher, Tooker, etc.

Woulfe says that the name arose in the Ely-O’Carroll region of County Tipperary and County Offaly, and migrated into. According to the article The Revival of Irish Names () from the Irish Fireside the meaning of Aine is ‘joy’, the name being anglicised as Anne or Anna, Hannah, Anastasia and pronounced “Ann-ya”, although other sources generally suggest ‘Awn-ya’.

Irish. This Donegal sept ruled territory centred on Inniskeel on the Fanad peninsula. They later migrated to Fermanagh where they became hereditary lawyers to the Maguires. Breslin and O’Morison, another County Donegal sept, also anglicised their names to Bryson.

Brown: English and Lowland Scottish. Derived in most Some Anglicised surnames in Ireland book as a nickname for. Here are 12 examples of Irish surnames and where they originate from courtesy of the Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland: Hickey. Hickey is the anglicised form of Ó hÍceadh ‘descendant of Ícidhe, a byname meaning ‘doctor, healer’.

This is evidenced in some early bearers from the 16th century onwards. The Tyrone surnames McCawell and O'Gormley often became Campbell and Grimes, while the fine Inishowen surname Ó Duibhdhíorma became O'Dermot and even Darby.

Many McDonnells in Ulster also became Donaldson s, while elsewhere in Ireland, people of for example the O'Byrne and O'Beirne surnames became Burns. Some Anglicised Surnames in Ireland. Hughes —The name Hughes is both of Welsh and Irish origin. In Ireland we have four septs of the name recorded.

The first sept of O'Hughes (O' h-Aodha) occupied the district of Ballintubber, Co. Roscommon; the second sept occupied a district on the borders of the present counties of Donegal and Fermanagh. Norman descendants today can be recognised by their surnames such as Condon, Bermingham, French, Butler, Barry, Power, Prendergast, Barrett, Plunkett, Roche, Burke, D’Arcy and Cogan.

Other norman names begin with Fitz (from the Norman for son) include Fitzgerald, Fitzgibbon and Fitzmaurice. Ireland was one of the earliest countries to evolve a system of hereditary surnames. More than 4, Gaelic, Norman and Anglo-Irish surnames are listed in this book, giving a wealth of information on the background and location of Irish families.

Edward MacLysaght was a leading authority on Irish names and family history. He served as Chief Herald and Genealogical Officer of the Irish Office.

The three centuries before independence saw a great influx of English and Scottish families, among them, no doubt, plenty of actual Bradleys, Harringtons, Hollands and Davenports.

As guides to. In the course of this website I have had some emails from those involved in surname groups questioning the accuracy of some maps. I have used 2 sources in making these maps: (1) census of Ireland (2) MacLysaghts book: 'The Surnames of Ireland.' As a scientist I am trained to look for, or spot paterns emerging in the results.

With surnames that pattern can reflect ethnicity. The Origins of Irish Surnames Although up to the tenth century, surnames in Ireland were not hereditary, the influence of the church, dating from this period, can still be seen in many common modern Irish surnames, in particular those beginning with "Gil-" or "Kil-", an anglicised version of the Irish Giolla, meaning follower or Gilmartin, in Irish Mac Giolla Mhairtin, means "son.

Ireland was one of the earliest countries to evolve a system of hereditary surnames. More than 4, Gaelic, Norman and Anglo-Irish surnames are listed in this book, giving a wealth of information on the background and location of Irish families.

Edward MacLysaght was a leading authority on Irish names and family s: Some Gaelic surnames in their modern anglicised form have acquired an equally un-Irish guise but have a foreign rather than an English look. Coen, a variant of Coyne, and Levy, a common abbreviation of Dunlevy, suggest the Jew; I know a Lomasney who is always refuting the erroneous belief that he is of French origin, and I expect Lavelles and.

Given that the English have been coming to Ireland one way or another for centuries, and the proximity of the two countries, it is not surprising that a good number of English names have become common in Ireland.

Not all English sounding names are what they seem to be however, many are Gealic names which were Anglicised in a way that makes them appear to be the same as a name from. This list excludes some of the notable Irish names with Norman and Welsh origins such as Burke, Butler, FitzGerald, Power, Walsh, etc.

These surnames all have their rightful place in Irish History, but do not have the Gaelic name origins needed for this list. A link to the Norman and Cambro-Norman surnames. The master book of Irish surnames: locations, ethnic origins, variant spellings & sources O (Small books) General Reference Special report on surnames in Ireland [together with] varieties & synonymes of surnames and Christian names in Ireland.

I would say all the ” Irish names” we are familiar with, Kelly, O’Donovan, aren’t Irish names at all. They are anglicised versions of Irish names.

I know this might sound strange to most, but O’Murchadha was the name used by that sect until Gaeilge was extinguished by the Anglos. Irish Pedigrees: Or the Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation. Transcription of a book by John O'Hart.

Irish Type III Home Page. An R1b cluster from Clare, Limerick, and Tipperary. Library Ireland - Some Anglicised Surnames in Ireland. The origins of over anglicised surnames in Ireland. Those surnames with an asterisk are listed in ‘The Surnames of Ireland’ Edward MacLysaght, sixth edition (), published by the Irish Academic Press, ISBN I have not used this book in the creation of this list, however consulting this book will give you some idea of where the surname or it’s variations may possibly be.

In other cases, the surname is sometimes an anglicised form of three Irish surnames. Two such surnames are Mac Giolla na Naomh, a name meaning "son of Gilla na Naomh"; and Mac Conshámha, a name meaning "son of Conshnámha".

These surnames were anglicised Ford because their final syllable was once erroneously thought to be the Irish áth ("ford"). Addeddate Call number ALF Camera Canon EOS 5D Mark II External-identifier urn:oclc:record Foldoutcount 0 Identifier. A formal Irish-language personal name consists of a given name and a es in Irish are generally patronymic in etymology, although they are no longer literal patronyms, as most Icelandic names are.

The form of a surname varies according to whether its bearer is male or female and in the case of a married woman, whether she chooses to adopt her husband's surname.

In some cases the interpretations were so different that two surnames from the same family line could appear to be totally unrelated. Names became Anglicised After the Cromwellian invasion of the 16th century, many people in Ireland dropped the prefixes as it became extremely difficult to find work if you had an Irish sounding name under.

50 Common Irish Surnames. Many of these early Irish surnames began as patronyms to identify a son separately from his father or a grandson from his grandfather.

This is why it is very common to see prefixes attached to Irish surnames. Mac, sometimes written Mc, is the Gaelic word for "son" and was attached to the father's name or trade. Bell, Robert: The book of Ulster surnames () Domhnaigh, Pádraig Mac Giolla: Some anglicised surnames in Ireland () MacLysaght, Edward: The surnames of Ireland () Smyth, William J: Atlas of Irish Names Ceallaigh, Séamus Ó: various works Dillon, Charlie: Sloinnte / surnames.

2 days ago  With more than 5, detailed surnames to crawl through, it was simply impossible to list all of them, but here are some of the Irish surnames listed in the dictionary and their origins. Murphy. Later on, in the s, the influence of the English resulted in some changes to Irish surnames.

Prefixes like Mac and O slowly stopped being used. Some Irish surnames were changed and Anglicized. The most common Irish surname is Murphy. It is the Anglicized version of the Irish surname O Murchadha and also of the Irish surname Mac Murchadha.

The Rugby Surnames of Ireland. Nothing brings out a loyal following like a sports match: the roar of the crowd, the elation of the win, the agony of the defeat.

In this letter we will show how Ireland's National Rugby team can leave aside "provincial politics" to make a power house team from the four corners of Ireland. Irish Surnames Home» Names. Irish names are used on the island of Ireland as well as elsewhere in the Western World as a result of the Irish diaspora.

A famous bearer of this surname is the fictional character Rhett Butler, created by Margaret Mitchell for her novel Gone with the Wind (). BYRNE Irish Variant of O'BYRNE. A later version of this article will include lists sorted by surnames.

For readers looking for Anglicized Irish versions of specific Gaelic surnames, please see my article 16th & 17th Century Anglicized Irish Surnames from Woulfe. I have also included a list of Sources I have used or plan to use for this article.

The Term Anglicized Irish. These surnames have all been anglicized from the same Irish surname – “Mac Aodha” (son of Aodh) or “O hAodha” (descendent of Aodh).

Aodh (pronounced “Aay” – rhymes with “hay”) was a very popular first name in Ireland up to the 10 th century.

CSU37 M3 First ed. published in under title: Some anglicised surnames in Ireland. Matheson, Robert Edwin, Sir, Special report on surnames in Ireland.

Mary- There are some great books for Irish research on One of the books that may help you is “Irish Names and Surnames” by Patrick Woulfe. The work begins with an illuminating history of Irish names, followed by a great dictionary: pages of Irish names in two arrangements, English-Irish and Irish-English.The surname originally signified a person with Polish French surname originated from an occupational name of a poultry breeder, or from a fearful person; it is derived from the Old French poule, which means "chicken".In other cases, particularly in Ireland, the English Poland is a variant of Polin,which is in turn an Anglicised.